Interesting subject isn’t it? How can anyone track a product like a flash component that is not capable to connect to a server and to update information about it?

Flash components unlike other software applications and plug-ins are not track-able. Once a customer get access to a MXP flash component package file, he can virtually give it away to all it’s friends, and nobody will know. There are no unique serial numbers given along with the flash components, there are no key to unlock a free trial versions, there is no way you can secure a full featured flash component.

Some of our flash components may look like something that you think you can do in 2 days of work. However I must tell you that each V3 flash component was developed for more than one month and there are various people who work on every single one of them in order to get it done properly. Under these circumstances it is very important for to keep tracking the usage of every component and it is very important for us that our customers will respect the law of copy and distributing software, so they would respect the hard work that we’ve done for all these products.

During last year we’ve tried something new, because we wanted to know how our customers managed to use our flash components, and we couldn’t get them all to write feedback emails. So we’ve embed some text in some of our flash components in order to see their results on Google; after months and months of indexing they started to get back to us, and by simply googleing the text included inside the components we’ve been able to track back all of those flash files that were using those text linked flash components (of course only those that have been indexed).

By placing a simple search in Google, looking for filetype:swf jumpeye you can easy find hundreds of flash works that embed a late version of waves effect, the loader pro v1.2 and a version of square effect. Starting with V3 components we’ve embed abstract IDs for each components in order to get track of where and how are our components used, and in order not to harm any of our component users, so they don’t need to link to us from inside of their work. This way we have fair information on how our customers managed to use our products, and what side of every product they used most.

9 Responses to “Tracking back the usage of Jumpeye’s flash components”

  1. RimV says:

    Brilliant !

    So the text you guys include in each component are placed in comment block inside an as file and when searching for “swf jumpeye”, Google will give back the swf files which are made by jumpeye component ?

  2. raulpopa says:

    Actually we now include an abstract id like: j8990v3
    And that is not included as comment, because Google indexes only textFields.
    To do so, you need to place a dynamic textfield inside a movieclip that is used by the component on stage. (it can be for example the frame2 of a movieclip used for livepreview, and which stops at the first frame initially, so noone will see it)
    The textfield should contain the id value before, and not set by script.

    Voila, that’s it 😛
    I know you like this method, it’s very easy to implement and it helps a lot in tracking component usage and get a smart feedback.

  3. RimV says:

    Thanks raul 🙂 this will help a lot !

  4. “There are no unique serial numbers given along with the flash components, there are no key to unlock a free trial versions, there is no way you can secure a full featured flash component.”

    Actually, that’s not the case anymore.

    I have developed the Desuade Licensing Platform (DLP) just for this. It lets developers protect their components with trial expirations, watermarks, serial numbers, and activation all automatically. From purchase to activation, everything is 100% automatic. You can see this in flawless action with Desuade Partigen.

    There’s no public info or signups, but if you’re team is interested, get in touch. I’d love to help out.

  5. 539ff28ac1c8 says:

    539ff28ac1c8…

    539ff28ac1c82a7c5c5a…

  6. randy says:

    I’m a little confused by the licensing. Can I use the free version of TextEff for my company’s website and also for my personal website? What kind of security features am I required to use on my website? I’m not familiar with these. Does that just mean I use the flash feature that doesn’t allow download of my swf file? What is the cost of TextEff? Is there a one time $99 price? Or do I have to pay an additional amount every year?

    thanks,

    randy

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